Close
The t.u. Funding Gap

The Texas Legislature currently gives preferential treatment to the University of Texas, funding them with $850 more per student than Texas A&M. This has to change!

We need to level the playing field, but it will only change if Aggies let their voices be heard.

As Texas A&M University grew over time, the University of Texas chose not to grow, capping its enrollment. But last session, the Legislature funded t.u. as if it were still growing — to the tune of an extra $55 million per biennium. Prior to that time, the funding was equitable.

Texas A&M has increased enrollment by 17,000 students (33%) in the last decade to keep pace with the growth of Texas. We have also maxed out our current resources to do this because we believe an educated Texas workforce is the key to our state’s continued economic miracle.

We have increased enrollment by 17,000 students (33%) in the last decade to keep pace with the growth of Texas. We have also maxed out our current resources to do this because we believe an educated Texas workforce is the key to our state’s continued economic miracle.

As Texas A&M research expenditures approached $1 billion last year, we achieved numerous scientific breakthroughs, such as the commercialization of a new strain of cotton that can help feed half a billion hungry people across the globe while doubling the income of cotton farmers.

Defend
The A&M Vet School.

The Texas Legislature is considering creating a second veterinary school, which is not needed and will dilute support for the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and our University System as a whole.

Here’s what the 2016 Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board had to say: “The high cost of establishing a new veterinary school would outweigh the potential benefits to the state.”

This is not about fear of competition or turf. It’s about making sure that the shrinking pool of state funds spent on higher education go to support either existing programs or to create new ones that are truly needed.

According to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board’s 2016 report, Texas A&M is meeting all of the veterinary medical needs of Texas.

Texas A&M has increased its class size by 25% to be the largest college of veterinary medicine in the U.S., and 60% of practicing veterinarians in the state are Aggie graduates. And A&M boasts the largest number of food animal, rural, and mixed animal veterinarians in the nation, with 40% of the 2018 class choosing these pathways.

Texas A&M has increased its class size by 25% to be the largest college of veterinary medicine in the U.S., and 60% of practicing veterinarians in the state are Aggie graduates. And A&M boasts the largest number of food animal, rural, and mixed animal veterinarians in the nation, with 40% of the 2018 class choosing these pathways.

The Texas A&M University System has invested $90 million in the Panhandle — which is where the new veterinary school would be located — with more to come. And it’s all in support of veterinary medicine, the livestock industries, local youth pursuing veterinary careers, and the region’s economic development.

Be an Aggie Leader

Email your elected officials and let your voice be heard. Fill out the form below to get started!

Be an Aggie Leader

Call your elected officials and let your voice be heard. Fill out the form below to get started!

Be an Aggie Leader

Tweet at your elected official and let your voice be heard. Fill out the form below to get started!

Be an Aggie Leader

Email your elected officials and let your voice be heard. Fill out the form below to get started!

Be an Aggie Leader

Call your elected officials and let your voice be heard. Fill out the form below to get started!

Be an Aggie Leader

Tweet at your elected official and let your voice be heard. Fill out the form below to get started!

Sign the Petition

Sign the petition and let your Aggie voice be heard. Stand with Texas A&M University on funding fairness and our Vet School.